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2. Define your purpose beyond business.
Unlike a business mission statement, your life mission statement de nes your personal purpose, based on your values and talents. It doesn’t have to include the fact that you are a business owner; it simply de nes the bigger mark you want to leave on the world. For example, Fast Company reports that Oprah Winfrey’s mission statement is: “To be a teacher. And to be known for inspiring my students to be more than they thought they could be.” Though Winfrey’s personal life mission has nothing to do with entertainment, her core purpose informs which avenues she uses to get her message to the masses. Take the same approach to your business pursuits and you’ll likely feel more ful lled by all you set out to accomplish.
3. Choose your time.
The romanticized notion of entrepreneurship doesn’t always compare to reality. Your time may be dominated by tasks that you neither enjoy, nor feel skilled at managing. You may spend early mornings, nights, and weekends tending to administrative needs rather than the creative functions that inspired you to open your doors. The best part of owning a business? You have the power to create the workday of your dreams! To identify opportunities for change, choose how your time is spent:
Create a detailed timeline of your ideal workday. (For example: From 11 a.m. to noon each day, I would spend time in the creative lab developing new recipes and concepts for new products).
For one week, track and list every business- related task you perform, in 15 minute increments. Include responding to emails, and commute times.
Compare your two lists once the week ends.
After comparing, if you see signi cant discrepancies, consider how you can eliminate at least four hours of daily tasks. That may mean delegating management of the customer service email inbox, hiring a freelance marketing coordinator, or making changes to your business model so you focus only a few select sales channels, or target audiences. Ultimately, you’ll work smarter instead of harder, and spend more of your time doing what you love instead of loathe.
4.
Visual clutter in your work environment can create feelings of frustration and anxiety. It may distract you and lead to becoming unproductive. If your work space includes old product samples that you no longer need, outdated marketing materials, chairs,  ling cabinets, lights that serve no functional purpose, and pens, markers, and staplers that no longer work - it’s time to clean house! As you assess what you need, remember this mantra of minimalism: Does this serve an everyday purpose? If the answer is no, it’s draining your workday more than it enhances it.
Surround your space with less.
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